European sex search engine


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In a landmark case about privacy versus freedom of speech, the Court of Justice of the European Union ruled yesterday that Google does not have to remove links worldwide when responding to Right to be Forgotten RTBF requests. The court has now ruled that the RTBF applies only in the EU Member States; the operator is not required to carry out de-referencing on all versions of its search engine. It is, however, required to carry out that de-referencing on the versions corresponding to all the Member States and to put in place measures discouraging Internet users from gaining access, from one of the Member States, to the links in question which appear on versions of that search engine outside the EU.

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Google wins landmark ‘right to be forgotten’ case in blow for privacy advocates

Google won the backing of ECJ court adviser Maciej Szpunar earlier this year who said that the right to be forgotten should only be enforced in Europe and not globally. Judges follow such non-binding opinions in four out of five cases. The issue is important because it affects conflicting fundamental rights, said Richard Cumbley, a partner at law firm Linklaters.

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Could there be a European Google?

But what about if your business is in China? SEO practices and search engine dominance will inevitably differ across the world in varying degrees, whether it is Google, Yandex or Baidu in pole position. This post looks at those search engines that aren't Google, and I will be looking into what makes each search engine unique if they are uniquewhy they function differently and what we can take from a more global perspective of SEO.

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The right, enshrined in a legal rulingrequired search engines to delete embarrassing or out-of-date information, when requested by the individuals concerned but in a landmark ruling on Tuesday, the European court of justice said search engine operators faced no obligation to remove information outside the country zone. The right to be forgotten was not an absolute right, the court said, and had to be balanced against other fundamental rights, in accordance with proportionality. The case originated in a dispute between Google and the French privacy regulator CNIL, which in called for the firm to globally remove links to pages containing damaging or false information about a person. Google introduced a geo-blocking feature in following year, which stopped European users from being able to see delisted links.