Sex with monguls


Deborah. Age: 26.
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A remarkable living legacy of the Mongol empire has been discovered by geneticists in a survey of human populations from the Caucasus to China. They find that as many as 8 percent of the men dwelling in the confines of the former Mongol empire bear Y chromosomes that seem characteristic of the Mongol ruling house. If so, some 16 million men, or half a percent of the world's male population, can probably claim descent from Genghis Khan. The finding seems to be the first proof, on a genetic level, of the occurrence in humans of sexual selection, a form of sex-based natural selection in which a male or female has an unusual number of offspring.

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Maeve. Age: 21.

Mongolian neo-Nazis: Anti-Chinese sentiment fuels rise of ultra-nationalism

Mongolian women had a higher social status than women in many other Asian societies, but were considered unable to herd cattle and possibly not horses. Mongolian women have historically enjoyed a somewhat higher status than women from other East Asian cultures. Women in Mongolia played vital roles in the family and economic life.


Sharon. Age: 24.

Transmongolian, the Secret History of the Mongols

Mark Pennini. Society and culture AsiaCentral Asia. Whether it is among the Soviet realist architecture of Ulaanbaatar or the thousands of gers studded across the Mongolian steppe, LGBT life in Mongolia seems non-existent.

One study suggests that up to 10 other men in Asian history have rivaled the procreative prowess of Khan. Even more astounding was that up to 8 percent of men living within the former area of the Mongol empire have Y chromosomes related to that royal line. The line of descent goes back around 1, years. Only the men are counted in this study because of its dependence on the Y chromosome for lineage analysis.